Honesty Extractions

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Blanchard, R. B. Jr. (2012). An organizational systems approach to the causes of academic cheating: Interactions among rule clarity, purpose, and role in school.

Citation
Blanchard, R. B. Jr. (2012). An organizational systems approach to the causes of academic cheating: Interactions among rule clarity, purpose, and role in school. Dissertation Abstracts International Section A: Humanities and Social Sciences (Doctoral dissertation). ProQuest Information & Learning, US.


Abstract
Academic cheating attracts considerable attention as a problem that appears to undermine society’s effort to prepare young people for responsible civic participation. Despite intense scrutiny, researchers continue to debate its causes. This investigation tested the application of an organizational systems theoretical approach to cheating.


The experimental design included mixed methods and a sample involving grade 7-12 students, teachers, and parents in one international school. Participants were randomly assigned to one of six versions of an investigator-devised hypothetical collaborative learning scenario. Each version of the scenario varied according to three levels of rule clarity and two levels of purpose. Survey item one asked participants to read the scenario and rate whether or not they thought cheating had occurred. Survey item two asked participants to report a reason for the rating judgment by selecting from five button-box options and/or writing in their own open-ended comment. Separate analyses of variance were conducted for the rating data. Results showed that the rule clarity variable had a significant effect on teacher (not student or parent) judgments and the purpose variable had a significant effect on parent (not student or teacher) judgments. An interaction effect was found for the teacher data set. A content analysis of the follow-up responses found that four factors accounted for rating judgments: the clarity of rules, the purpose of the task, the nature of student collaboration, and school policy. The groups consistently reported that the attribution of cheating depended on the teacher’s rule communication. Unclear rules can lead to a gray area in the interpretation of student intentions and behaviors. The role of grades is a further source of confusion. Findings support the theory that academic cheating has roots in the social environment of schooling. School leaders need to ensure that all community members understand and are in agreement about academic expectations.

Dilmac, B., Kulaksizoglu, A., & Eksi, H. (2007). An examination of the humane values education program on a group of science high school students.

Citation
Dilmac, B., Kulaksizoglu, A., & Eksi, H. (2007). An examination of the humane values education program on a group of science high school students. Educational Sciences: Theory & Practice, 7(3), 1241-1261.


Abstract
The purpose of this study is to find out whether the humane values education program has produced any changes on the students' level of humane values. The research was conducted with the first-and second-grade students in Konya Meram Science High School in the 2006-2007 academic year. Thirty students participated in the study. Half of the participants were assigned to the experimental group and the other half to the control group. The research period spans April & May. Having prepared the education program and the scale, the experimental and control groups were formed objectively.

The experimental group, consisting of 15 students, was provided with the Humane Values Education Program lasting 14 sessions. Two sessions were held in a week. Statistical methods were used to balance the control and experimental group. The control group didn't receive any program. Findings of the research can be summarized as follows: Between the pre-test and post-test of the experimental group, a significant difference can be seen in favor of the post- test. There is no such a difference for the control group. According to the post-test results of the control and experimental group, there are meaningful differences in favor of the experimental group in the sub dimensions of responsibility, friendship, amiability, respect, honesty, and tolerance. Thus, these results show the effectiveness of the program presented. The sub dimensions of the Humane Values Education Program given above show that this study is effective with regard to affective, cognitive, and behavioral outcomes. Suggestions are made in the light of the findings and it has been concluded that the program is effective in the development of secondary education students' value acquisition.

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Kulaksizoglu, A., & Dilmac, B. (2003). Imparting education in human values to primary education students and testing it by implementing a Moral Maturity Scale.

Citation
Kulaksizoglu, A., & Dilmac, B. (2003). Imparting education in human values to primary education students and testing it by implementing a Moral Maturity Scale. Studia Psychologica, 45(1), 43–50.

Abstract
The general objective of this study is to expose fourth and fifth grade primary education students to the Educational Human Values (EHV) Program, and to test its effectiveness by implementing a Moral Maturity Scale. The EHV Program was developed by June Auton in England and consisted of five core values called Truth, Love, Peace, Right Conduct, and Non-Violence, and 44 sub-values. This study is a quasi-experimental one. A model involving a pre-test-post-test control group has been implemented in the study.

The target group of our study consisted of 36 fourth and fifth grade primary education orphan students (aged 10-11 yrs). The result has verified that the EHV Program would improve the moral maturity levels of the students who participated.

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Seider, S., Novick, S., & Gomez, J. (2013). Cultivating the Academic Integrity of Urban Adolescents with Ethical Philosophy Programming.

Citation
Seider, S., Novick, S., & Gomez, J. (2013). Cultivating the Academic Integrity of Urban Adolescents with Ethical Philosophy Programming. Peabody Journal of Education, 88(2), 142–158.

Abstract
This mixed-methods study considered the effects of ethical philosophy programming at a high-performing, high-poverty urban high school upon the academic integrity of participating adolescents (n = 279). Analyses of pre-post survey data revealed that participating adolescents reported significantly higher levels of academic integrity than their peers at a matched comparison school. Field notes from observations of ethical philosophy lessons and qualitative interviews with participating students revealed that this programming offered students frequent opportunities to practice moral reasoning

and introduced philosophical perspectives that influenced students’ conception of and commitment to academic integrity.

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Stephens, J. M., & Wangaard, D. B. (2013). Using the Epidemic of Academic Dishonesty as an Opportunity for Character Education: A Three-Year Mixed Methods Study.

Extract
Stephens, J. M., & Wangaard, D. B. (2013). Using the Epidemic of Academic Dishonesty as an Opportunity for Character Education: A Three-Year Mixed Methods Study (with Mixed Results). Peabody Journal of Education, 88(2), 159–179.

Abstract
Academic dishonesty among high school students has long since transformed into an epidemic that affects nearly every student, compromising not only their intellectual growth but also their moral development. Yet, beyond the occasional hand-wringing in the media, the problem has been largely ignored by teachers, schools, policymakers, and even character educators. To address this notable failure to respond, the authors developed and evaluated a character education program that sought to use the epidemic of academic dishonesty as an opportunity to reduce cheating and promote

integrity. The present article describes the core components and central mechanisms of this schoolwide program as well as results from a 3-year mixed methods study of its implementation at 3 high schools in the Northeastern United States. These results and their implications are discussed in detail. The article also outlines suggestions for further program development and research.

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Vinski, E. J., & Tryon, G. S. (2009). Study of a cognitive dissonance intervention to address high school students’ cheating attitudes and behaviors.

Extract
Vinski, E. J., & Tryon, G. S. (2009). Study of a cognitive dissonance intervention to address high school students’ cheating attitudes and behaviors. Ethics & Behavior, 19(3), 218–226.

Abstract
Forty-four high school students took part in focus-type group that used an induced hypocrisy paradigm developed from cognitive dissonance theory (Festinger, 1957) to reduce cheating behavior. Posttesting following the intervention showed that, contrary to expectations, these students’ attitudes toward cheating and self-reported cheating behaviors did not decrease relative to those of 65 control participants who did not participate in the group intervention. All participants reported a greater intention to cheat in the future at posttest as well as an increase in cheating behavior. Although

participants did not view cheating favorably, a large majority admitted cheating and indicated that they had never been caught.

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